Difference between revisions of "Immortechnics"

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Definitions of transhumanism[edit]
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Definitions of Immortechnics
 
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A term that refers to the entirety of technologies, real and theoretical, that are related to and/or required for radical life extension (or in extreme cases, even immortality).
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First, what do we mean by radical life extension? We don't mean a few months, or even a few years. Centuries, millenia, and even longer. This may seem insane, especially the thought of the ability to live for a million years, but I would hazard a guess that managing to break through the limits on the human body's lifespan that we see now, relating to aging and disease, will take us to a place where there might well be few to no limits on lifespan - perhaps the only one would be "filling" the brain - where it has as much experience as it can handle, and technologies are being considered that may help with that.
  
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What kind of technologies? Cryonics, for example - freezing someone, so that someday later in the future, the person can be thawed, any problems fixed, and return to living. Calorie restriction is another, as there is some evidence that it can dramatically increase someone's lifespan, perhaps long enough for other technologies to take over from there. Uploading is a more exotic idea, and one that could quite concievably open the possibility to incredibly long life spans.
  
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Much of these ideas might be called pipe dreams, nonsense by many people, as thinking has often been influenced by the Tithonus Syndrome, or conscious or subconscious deathism.
  
 
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"When I decided to write this article, I tried these ideas out on several groups and had them respond to informal polls. I was amazed to find that at least three quarters of the audience seemed to feel that our life spans were already too long. "Why would anyone want to live for five hundred years? Wouldn't it be boring? What if you outlived all your friends? What would you do with all that time?" they asked. It seemed as though they secretly feared that they did not deserve to live so long. I find it rather worrisome that so many people are resigned to die. Might not such people be dangerous, who feel that they do not have much to lose?"
 
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          -- Marvin Minsky, in his article "Will Robots Inherit the Earth?"
 
 
"Transhumanism is a class of philosophies of life that seek the continuation and acceleration of the evolution of intelligent life beyond its currently human form and human limitations by means of science and technology, guided by life-promoting principles and values" - Max More, 1990
 
 
 
"Transhumanism is a way of thinking about the future that is based on the premise that the human species in its current form does not represent the end of our development but rather a comparatively early phase" - Transhumanist FAQ
 
 
 
"Transhumanism is the philosophy that we can and should develop to higher levels, both physically, mentally and socially using rational methods" - Anders Sandberg, 1997
 
 
 
"Transhumanists view human nature as a work-in-progress, a half-baked beginning that we can learn to remold in desirable ways. Current humanity need not be the endpoint of evolution. Transhumanists hope that by responsible use of science, technology, and other rational means we shall eventually manage to become posthuman beings with vastly greater capacities than present human beings have" - Nick Bostrom, 2003
 
 
 
"Transhumanism promotes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and evaluating the opportunities for enhancing the human condition and the human organism opened up by the advancement of technology; attention is given to both present technologies, like genetic engineering and information technology, and anticipated future ones, such as molecular nanotechnology and artificial intelligence" - Nick Bostrom, 2003
 
 
 
"Transhumanism is the science-based movement that seeks to transcend human biological limitations via technology" - Philippe van Nedervelde, 2015
 
 
 
"Transhumanism anticipates tomorrow’s humanity: Envisaging the positive qualities and characteristics of future intelligent life; Taking steps towards achieving these qualities and characteristics; Identifying and managing risks of negative characteristics of future intelligent life" - Transpolitica website, 2015
 

Revision as of 11:25, 11 November 2017

Immortechnics are the collective technologies, activities, fields of study, or lifestyle factors which are applied to attempt radical life extension, such as calorie-restricted dieting, cryonics, medical nano, mind-uploading, etc. Specific Immortechnics might be applied in various anathophies (Text by Mark Plus, in Anders Sandberg's Transhuman Terminology Initially published on 10 November 2001).


Definitions of Immortechnics Main definitions:



A term that refers to the entirety of technologies, real and theoretical, that are related to and/or required for radical life extension (or in extreme cases, even immortality). First, what do we mean by radical life extension? We don't mean a few months, or even a few years. Centuries, millenia, and even longer. This may seem insane, especially the thought of the ability to live for a million years, but I would hazard a guess that managing to break through the limits on the human body's lifespan that we see now, relating to aging and disease, will take us to a place where there might well be few to no limits on lifespan - perhaps the only one would be "filling" the brain - where it has as much experience as it can handle, and technologies are being considered that may help with that.

What kind of technologies? Cryonics, for example - freezing someone, so that someday later in the future, the person can be thawed, any problems fixed, and return to living. Calorie restriction is another, as there is some evidence that it can dramatically increase someone's lifespan, perhaps long enough for other technologies to take over from there. Uploading is a more exotic idea, and one that could quite concievably open the possibility to incredibly long life spans.

Much of these ideas might be called pipe dreams, nonsense by many people, as thinking has often been influenced by the Tithonus Syndrome, or conscious or subconscious deathism.

"When I decided to write this article, I tried these ideas out on several groups and had them respond to informal polls. I was amazed to find that at least three quarters of the audience seemed to feel that our life spans were already too long. "Why would anyone want to live for five hundred years? Wouldn't it be boring? What if you outlived all your friends? What would you do with all that time?" they asked. It seemed as though they secretly feared that they did not deserve to live so long. I find it rather worrisome that so many people are resigned to die. Might not such people be dangerous, who feel that they do not have much to lose?"

          -- Marvin Minsky, in his article "Will Robots Inherit the Earth?"