Difference between revisions of "Logan Thrasher Collins"

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== Select publications ==  
 
== Select publications ==  
* Collins, Logan T. [https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.09362 The case for emulating insect brains using anatomical "wiring diagrams" equipped with biophysical models of neuronal activity] (arXiv:1812.09362) (2018)  
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* Collins, Logan T. [https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.09362 The case for emulating insect brains using anatomical "wiring diagrams" equipped with biophysical models of neuronal activity] (arXiv:1812.09362) (2018)
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* Logan T. Collins, Peter B. Otoupal, Jocelyn K. Campos, Colleen M. Courtney, and Anushree Chatterjee. [https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.biochem.8b00888?journalCode=bichaw Design of a De Novo Aggregating Antimicrobial Peptide and a Bacterial Conjugation-Based Delivery System]. ''Biochemistry'', (2018)
  
 
==External Links==
 
==External Links==

Revision as of 09:00, 29 December 2018

Logan and friends at the International BioGENEius Challenge

Logan Thrasher Collins is a futurist, synthetic biologist, and innovator currently attending the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Logan is a founder and admin for the Facebook group Technical Transhumanism (852 members as of October 19, 2018). On September 28th, 2018 he created the Facebook group, Neural circuits: computational, molecular, and anatomical approaches (264 members as of October 19, 2018). He was an attendee at the 2017 and 2018 Princeton Envision Conference.

Rational Romanticism - April 2018

"At the inaugural Da Vinci Speaker's Series event, Logan Thrasher Collins makes the case that there is a tremendous amount of fertile ground at the interface between aesthetics and science. Though science is meant to be an unbiased and dispassionate enterprise, the ways in which grand scientific undertakings are conceived, justified, pursued, and communicated are often mytho-poetic in nature -- note that many of the great rockets are named for Greek and Roman gods."[1]

Select publications

External Links

References