Cryonics Society of Canada

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The Cryonics Society of Canada is a nonprofit cryonics advocacy and education organization based in Toronto, Canada.[1][2][3][4] It was founded by Douglas Quinn in 1987, and its president is Christine Gaspar.[3][5][6] Other members include Ben Best and Keegan Macintosh.[6][7]

External links

References

  1. "Home Page". Cryonics Society of Canada. "The Cryonics Society of Canada (CSC) is a Canadian non-profit corporation dedicated to informing Canadians about cryonics and cryonics in Canada."
  2. "Cryonics Society of Canada". Termium Plus. Government of Canada. 19 April 2013. "The Cryonics Society of Canada (CSC) is a Canadian non-profit corporation dedicated to informing Canadians about cryonics in Canada."
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ubelacker, Sheryl (7 October 2015). "Can cryonic preservation – literal brain freeze – allow people to live forever?". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. "Christine Gaspar, 42, an emergency room nurse from Amaranth, Ont., northwest of Toronto, is a CI member and president of the Cryonics Society of Canada, an educational and advocacy organization."
  4. Perry, R. Michael (2000). Forever for All: Moral Philosophy, Cryonics, and the Scientific Prospects for Immortality. Universal Publishers. p. 610. ISBN 1581127243. "Cryonics Society of Canada [...] Toronto, Ontario Canada"
  5. "History of the Cryonics Society of Canada". Cryonics Society of Canada. "In the Fall of 1987 Douglas Quinn, then a psychology student at McMaster University, launched the Cryonics Society of Canada (CSC) and CANADIAN CRYONICS NEWS (CCN). [...] When CSC lost contact with Guy early in 2003, Toronto emergency care nurse Christine Gaspar was appointed Interim President just before the May 2003 elections and was officially elected President in May."
  6. 6.0 6.1 "Federal Corporation Information]". Government of Canada. "Directors [...] CHRISTINE GASPAR [...] BENJAMEN BEST [...] KEEGAN MACINTOSH"
  7. Monette, Michael (17 April 2012). "Spending eternity in liquid nitrogen". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 184 (7): 747–748. doi:10.1503/cmaj.109-4144. ISSN 0820-3946. "That’s occasionally caused a problem, says 27-year-old Keegan Macintosh, a third-year law student at the University of British Columbia, a director of the Cryonics Society of Canada and head of the UBC Life Extension Club."